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weekend with top nonfiction books and authors. booktv.org. >> jeanne three yo harris recounts rosa parks' political activism. she argues she is often only remembered for her bus arrest in montgomery, alabama, but her involvement in the civil rights movement was far more extensive. this is about an hour, five. >> good evening. my name is georgette norman, director of troy university rosa parks' museum. on behalf of the chancellor, the faculty, student body, i welcome you to our campus. i want to ask you a question. very glad you're here. how are you politicized? how are you acculture ated? want you to think about that. as we honor rosa parks' 100% birthday, we have -- 100th birthday, we have the honor of having with us to start this whole celebration off dr. jeannie theoharis who asked that question of rosa parks. what was behind that no? that no heard round the world? those little two letters that opened the floodgates of all those divergent streams into that one vast ocean. at the time that no carried with it great risk. risk in terms of gender, class and race. the question is, what is
are you acculturated? i want you to think about that. as they honor rosa parks a hundred earth day, we have the honor of having with us dr. jeanne theoharis, who asked the question of rosa parks. what was behind that? that no heard round the world. consider two letters that open the floodgates of mother's day vergence dreams into that one vast ocean. at the time risk in terms of gender, class and race. the question is, what it behind that kind of courage? one makes one take those stands and more importantly, what is the price paid for having done so? .your jeanne theoharis and to some of those questions and she writes it in her new book, "the rebellious life of mrs. rosa parks" "the rebellious life of mrs. rosa parks" was born and spent about six weeks and moved to milwaukee, wisconsin where she was raised. as professor of political science at brooklyn college. she's also profounder of educators for civil liberty. she's the author of numerous books on the civil rights movement and politics of race in the united state. including this co-author of school of thought, students talk back to
".com. >> jeanne theoharis recounts the life of rosa parks. she is most remembered for her bus arrest in montgomery, alabama. her involvement was far more extensive. this is about an hour and five minutes. >> good evening. on behalf of the chancellor and faculty, i welcome you to our campus. how are we culture he? on rosa parks 101st day, her birthday, the author explores the question of rosa parks. what was behind that? those that know her. .. what is the price paid for having done something? dr. jeanne theoharis answers some of those questions and she writes it in her new book "the rebellious life of mrs. rosa parks". jeanne theoharis was born in staten island six weeks ago and her family moved to milwaukee, wisconsin, where she was raised. she held the first chair in woman's studies and as professor of science at boca raton college, she is also co-founder of educators for civil liberty. she is the author of numerous books on the civil-rights movement and the politics of race in the united states including as co-author of schools suck:students talk back to the segregated nation and its failures o
they were basically on vacation. >> host: rosa parks civil rights leader and activist will be commemorated in a statue unveiled today in the capital. here now to tell us more about the sculpture and processes eugene dog. >> good morning, thank you. >> host: tell us how you were selected to create this piece the sculpture of rosa parks? >> guest: i'm sorry repeat that. >> host: how were you when your firm selected to create the sculpture? >> guest: it was decided by the nea and it was a national competition and i believe there were over 150 entries and then it was narrowed down to five finalists. those five finalists competed and that is how we ended up getting it. >> this will be in statuary hall in the capitol building. i am learning from the l.a. times the first full-size statue of an african-american in the capital collection in more than 180 statues. what did it mean to you to create a? >> first of all it's the first african-american woman in statuary hall in the resident capital and century hall and i think is one other in the capital. but it is a tremendous honor and privilege to hav
dedicated stature statue of rosa parks in the u.s. capital. the first african-american to be honored that way. congress authorized the statue in 2005 shortly after she died. we will show you that ceremony in a few moments after a short talk with the statue sculptor. >> host: rosa parks civil rights leader and activist will be commemorated in a statute that will be unveiled today in the capital. here now to tell us more about the sculpture in the process is eugene delp. good morning and thanks for talking to us. tell us how you are selected to create this piece. the sculpture of rosa parks. >> i'm sorry ,-com,-com ma repeat that. >> host: how were your firm selected to create the structure? >> guest: it was decided by the nah or the nea, i'm sorry and it was a national competition. i believe there were over 150 entries and then it was narrowed down to five finalists. those five finalists competed and that is how we ended up getting it. >> host: this will be in statuary hall in the capitol building paradigm reading from the l.a. times and it says the first full-size statue of an africa
. one of the ways in which i try to explain this is rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give a per seat on the montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that we are talking about him today. he -- she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had and to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said as you well know that while she was sitting on that bus refusing to give seat she was thinking about emmett till begun 14-year-old black boy from chicago who went to mississippi in 1955 and because he looked at a white woman he was brutally murdered. do you think his death changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. it was his death and brown versus board of education decision. it was the killing of civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, a young high school student who led a walkout at the segregated school protest
rights icon rosa parks by unveiling a statute in the u.s. capitol, the first full statue of an african-american to stand in the halls of congress, across the street, the supreme court will be hearing arguments from those challenging the constitutionality, the voting rights act reauthorization named in part for rosa parks. an act both republicans and democrats came together after extensive days and days and days and weeks and weeks of hearings and signed into law by a republican president. in the pending case, the challengers of the supreme court seek to strike down section 5 of the voting rights act, even though that critical section is protecting the constitutional guarantees against discrimination and voting where 100 years of prior civil rights laws have failed. now, the supreme court got it right four years ago when they upheld the constitutional authority of congress to reauthorize section 5 against a similar challenge. neither the words of the constitution nor the importance of these critical provisions protecting the right to vote has changed in the last four years. under these
't stand for this and long before rosa parks, she decided to conduct write-ins to protest. and in addition to the printing of her life story called the book of life, sojourner describes one of the incidence. neither conductor or driver noticed her and soon another followed and she raised her hand again but they also turned away she then gave three tremendous yelps. i want to ride. i want to ride. consternation seized. people, go-karts of every description stood still. the car was locked up in traffic and before it moved on, sojourner jumped aboard. then there rose a shot from the crowd. she has beaten them. the angry conductor told her he would put her out. quietly seating herself she informed them she was a passenger. beauford where the horses are or i will throw you out, said he in a menacing voice. she was mayor neither from maryland or virginia for the threat. but from the empire state of new york and nouvelle law as well as he did. several soldiers were in the cars and another passenger scheme in the related of the circumstances that said you have heard that old woman talk to the cond
but equal is a fraud. separate but equal is the language that tried to push rosa parks to the back of a bus. separate but equal is determined that black and white people could not possibly drink from the same water fountain, eat at the same table or use the same toilets. separate but equal are the words that justified sending children to different schools from their white kids, schools that would fail them and condemn them to a life of poverty. it is an excerpt from the book of segregationists and racists, the same statement, the same idea, the same delusion that we borrow in this country to say women could vote but only if they were married and only when they were over 30. it is the same night eddie that gave way for my dad being a citizen when he arrived in 1956 but refused by landlords and proclaim no grand, no irish, no dock. entrenched who he was, who our friends could be and what our lives could become. this is not separate but equal, it is separate and discriminated, separate and browbeaten, separate and subjugated. as long as there is one rule for one and another for them we allow t
the capital to dedicate a statue to civil rights activist rosa parks. here are some of what he had to say. >> well, they are out of inertia, salt or status. they are out of fear or simple lack of moral imagination. we so often spend our lives as if in a folly accepting injustice, rationalizing inequity, tolerating the intolerable like the bus driver, but also like the passengers on the bus. we see the way things are. children hungry in the land of plenty, tired neighborhoods ravaged by violence, families hobbled by job loss. we make excuses for inaction. we say to ourselves, that's not my responsibility. there's nothing i can do. rosa parks tells us there's always something we can do. she tells us that we all have responsibilities to ourselves and to one another. she reminds us that this is how change happens. not mainly to the experts at the famous and powerful, but through the countless acts, often anonymous courage and kindness and fellow feeling and responsibility to continually come disturbingly expand our c
-- rosa delaura. people on the outside. judy lickman in 1993 was head of the legal women's defense fund. she and her colleague played critical rules in getting the fmla written, introduced and across the finish line. i want to mention those heroes who worked so hard for this important bill. but there's still more work to do, mr. president, to insure that families are fully able to see their family responsibilities as well as maintain economic security. today workers are ineligible to take fmla for a variety of reasons. some workers do not have enough tenure with their current employer, even if they have been in the workforce for years. you see, the fmla requires a year of service. but in today's economy, workers more frequently change jobs. and, of course, family emergencies happen without warning. other workers are not able to accumulate the required 1,250 hours of work at a single employer in the preceding year. with the growth in part-time work, both by choice and by necessity, more workers may be ineligible for fmla even though they are long-term, dedicated employees. and millions o
is a fraud. separate but equal is the language that tries to push rosa parks to the back of the bus. separate but equal is the motive that determines that black and white people could not possibly drink from the same water fountain to meet at the same table, or use the same toilet. separate but equal is the words that justifies spending -- sending children to different schools that would bail them ann them to a life of poverty. is an excerpt from the segregationist and the racist. it is this same statement, the same ideas, and the same delusion that we borrowed in this country to say that women could vote, but only if they were married and only when they were over 30. it is the same meditate that gave wait for my dad being a citizen when he arrived here in 1956 but refused by landlords and proclaimed no rights, no irish, though -- entrance to we were, who our friends could be and what our lives to become. this is not separate but equal. it is separate and discriminated , separate and repressed, separate and browbeaten, separate and subjugated. separate is not equal. so let's be rid of it. as
, and we sat at a beautiful ceremony where a statue was unveiled of rosa parks, and one of the speakers talked about, in kind of a humble and pedestrian setting, she just had a decision to make. and the decision was do we just kind of go along? do i just kind of do what's always been done? i just kind of keep drifting into a situation that i know is unjust and unequal; or do i decide to do something different? we are drifting toward something that is very bad, something that members of congress believe strongly when the bill was first put in place should not happen and would harm people and would harm our economy. and that's the moment we are in right now, a moment to make a decision. and the decision is do we allow ourselves to drift in a way that hurts people or do we choose a balanced approach that will help people, that will strengthen the economy, that will strengthen our budget, that will strengthen our ability to create jobs and it will strengthen the reputation of this body. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. mr. warner: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senato
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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